Wisconsin Emergency Management
 

Severe Weather Watches and Warnings

What to Listen For... What to Listen For

When conditions are favorable for severe weather to develop, a WATCH is issued. As storms develop, National Weather Service personnel use information from weather radar, storm spotters, and other sources to issue Severe Thunderstorm and Tornado WARNINGS for areas where severe weather is imminent or already occurring.

Watches and warnings are relayed to local radio and television stations and are broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.

Know the difference between a watch and a warning. A tornado watch means that tornadoes are possible and you should be monitoring the situation via a NOAA Weather Radio, your local television stations, or your cell phone which will send you a Wireless Emergency Alert. A tornado warning indicates that a tornado has been spotted either on radar or visually by spotters on the ground. Take shelter immediately.

Know the signs of a tornado. The sky may have a dark green or black color to it. Also watch for any type of hail, any large dark cloud that sits lower than the others, or a loud roar similar to a freight train.

Know how a tornado works. Tornadoes can come from any direction but they typically move from the southwest to the northeast. Tornadoes are transparent at first and may not be visible until they start to pick up debris. Tornadoes generally move forward at about 70 miles an hour, or about a mile a minute.

Know what to do after a tornado. Check for injuries and apply first aid if necessary. Only call 911 if it is an emergency. For example, if you hear a gas leak, get everyone out of the area immediately and call 911. Donít go into buildings that are damaged. The risk of collapse. Never light a candle to examine buildings, always use a flashlight. Wear long sleeves, pants, gloves and boots or sturdy shoes when looking through debris. Nails and glass are sure to be everywhere. http://www.crh.noaa.gov/crh/?n=2013_ibw_info





For More Information.....

Check out these web sites for more safety tips, the latest weather forecast, and other weather awareness information.

NOAA National Weather Service
http://weather.gov
Click on your part of the state for local weather information

Lightning Safety
http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov

Flood Safety
http://www.floodsafety.noaa.gov

Tornado Preparedness Plan for Schools
http://www.weather.gov/arx/?n=schoolprep

StormReady Ė Community Preparedness
http://www.stormready.noaa.gov

American Red Cross
http://www.redcross.org

Wisconsin Emergency Management
http://www.emergencymanagement.wi.gov


Ready Wisconsin
http://www.readywisconsin.wi.gov

FEMA For Kids
http://www.ready.gov/kids

Ready Classroom: K-8 Preparedness Resources
http://readyclassroom.discoveryeducation.com

Ready: Prepare, Plan, Stay Informed
http://www.ready.gov

American Red Cross Masters of Disaster
http://www2.redcross.org/disaster/masters

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ReadyWisconsin is an initiative of Wisconsin Emergency Management designed to educate and empower Wisconsinites to prepare for
and respond to all kinds of emergencies including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.

Wisconsin Emergency Management
2400 Wright St.
Madison, WI 53704
Phone: 608.242.3000     Fax: 608.242.3247